Image for post
Image for post
If lettuce was data, you too could be this cool! Photo by ThisisEngineering RAEng on Unsplash

It depends on what you enjoy building with code. You should try both and see. Here is how I would find out.

Build a small software program that does something interesting. An example could be a python program that web scrapes the top headline on a website that you follow.

Manipulate some data in python pandas. Take a dataset that is related to one of your interests and transform (clean up) the data with pandas. Then explore the data and display some charts. (Kaggle has tons of great datasets.)

Which of those exercises did you enjoy the most?

If you…


Image for post
Image for post
The guy in the chair’s name is Web. Photo by Adam Sherez on Unsplash

Recently I wanted to get all the links in an archive of newsletters. The goal was to have a text file with the links so that I didn’t have to manually go through each newsletter.

This is a real world example so I wanted it to be fast and easy. This is how I actually did it with python.

The best web scraping package for python in BeautifulSoup. And the best package for making url calls is Requests.

pip install beautifulsoup4, requests

I did all the python work in a jupyter notebook. I tend to use jupyter if I am…


Image for post
Image for post
Guaranteed this buckaroo will give a thorough code review. Photo by Ali Hajian on Unsplash

Code reviews are one of the most important activities in the daily workings of a software team. They are an opportunity for everyone to become familiar with the codebase. They help prevent siloing (one person becoming the only source of knowledge). And they are a great opportunity for beginning programmers to learn from more experienced programmers.

When I do a python code review, I’m looking for several things.

Here is a list of eight basic things I look for first.


A carnival ride called Zipper.
A carnival ride called Zipper.
Take a wild ride with Dart’s Zip and Reduce! Photo by Jake Weirick on Unsplash

As a Python developer who is also writing Dart, there are a few things I was missing when developing in Dart. One of those was the mighty zip function. The zip function in Python is really handy for combining two or more lists into a list of lists. (actually python returns an iterator of tuples, but it serves the same purpose) This zipping operation is pretty common in data science when cleaning up data.

After a little digging, I found the zip function in Dart. It’s in a package called Quiver. I’m not sure if it is a core package…


An old time picture of a dart throwing team.
An old time picture of a dart throwing team.
You can bet these swell chaps enjoy a finely crafted list comprehension in Dart. Photo by Museums Victoria on Unsplash

In my day job as a Python developer, I use list comprehensions a lot. Now that I’ve been doing some development in Dart, and more specifically Flutter, I wanted a place to reference the common list comprehension style executions in Dart. So here are a few good ones.

The Map() Method
Let’s start with a simple list of integers:

var int_list = [1, 2, 3, 4];

Python’s:

[x + 1 for x in my_list]

In Dart you would use the map() method like this:

var int_list_plus_1 = int_list.map((x) => x + 1).toList();

Returns [2, 3, 4, 5] The reason that…

Python Is Rad

Python Is Rad is a weekly newsletter on all things python. — PythonIsRad.com

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store